Over the centuries there have been many herbal remedies for gout treatment. The effectiveness of such remedies has ranged from being reasonable to highly dubious in nature. One of the many types of gout treatment that has received interest recently is ginger. Ginger, derived from ginger root, has been in use as an herbal medicine dating back thousands of years, but its effectiveness as gout treatment remains to be fully examined.

Gout is the swelling and inflammation of joints, particularly those in the lower regions of the body such as the feet, ankles and knees that causes great pain in attacks that can last up to ten days. Gout generally affects people over the age of 40 and is related to arthritis. However, the root cause of gout is the build up of uric acid in the blood. Normally, the kidneys filter the uric acid out of the blood stream where it is then gathered in the bladder to be passed out of the body.

But in some cases there is too much uric acid for the kidneys to filter out, this leads to an excessive buildup with then finds its way to the joints of the feet, ankles and knees, though in truth uric acid can congregate in any joint in the body, but generally if it is either malformed or previously injured. Once the uric acid gathers in a joint it begins to crystallize and harden. The result is swelling, loss of mobility and a great deal of pain. Such attacks of gout rise then fade over a ten day period in most cases.

The modern gout treatment generally includes prescribed medicines plus an increase of water intake and eating a healthy diet. Exercise is also encouraged as a method of keeping the joints more mobile and the effects of gout attacks less debilitating. Also, keeping a normal weight for the body also assists in overcoming the effects of gout as additional weight puts more pressure on the joints.

The use of herbal medicines as an alternative to prescribed medications has been on the rise in recent years. Ginger in particular has been cited as one potentially effective means of combating gout as ginger contains anti-inflammation qualities which have been used for other types of medical conditions. However, there has not been a modern western medical study done of the effects of ginger in humans who suffer from gout. Most of the evidence gathered so far has been anecdotal in nature.

This is not to say that the use of ginger has no effect, but clearly the medical data is lacking in the area of treating the effects of gout upon the joints. Used in moderation, ginger can have a positive effect on the body and does contain some anti-inflammatory ingredients which can assist in keeping mobility and reducing pain in the joints. However, there is no current proven evidence that ginger is an effective form of gout treatment and anyone who is taking prescription medication should consult with their physician before consuming ginger.